Inspire me

I just read Doug Wilson’s latest political post. It resonated with me, because of this:

Positions aside, the hunger for this kind of charismatic leadership is virtually universal. It was fun for those on the right to mock the Obama-messianism of the Democrats, but a funny thing happened on the way to the Republican convention. Judging from the response to Sarah Palin, it seems that conservatives were every bit as starved for it as the progressives were.

I thought about it, and he’s right. At least, he’s right about me.

I do want a civil leader that I can be excited about following. I want someone inspiring, who will make me want to do hard work on behalf of my country.

Though, I’m also pretty sure that I know what this person would have to look like.

This person would need to be willing to stand up in front of everyone and tell it like it is. I appreciated Jesse Ventura as a candidate because I knew, without a doubt, where he stood. I want to hear hard truth from a political candidate.

This person would need to demonstrate his ability to parse difficult subjects. I want to hear nuanced comments from a political candidate.

This person would need to be able to make drastic choices when necessary. For example, I want a man to run for president who will veto every bill that he receives until Congress sends him the Sanctity of Life bill, or one with comparable language. I want someone who isn’t afraid to play hardball in defense of what is right.

This person would need to be willing to stand up and admit when he has been wrong. I don’t mean damage control, either. I mean actual retractions and apologies. I want someone who remembers that he is still a fallible, sinful human being.

So, this is a call-out to all those who are considering political office, whether in the present or in the future. I’m a voter. Impress me. Inspire me. It will be hard, but it can be done.

I want to believe. Be the kind of person I can believe.

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5 responses to “Inspire me

  • Gerald Cameron

    This person would need to be able to make drastic choices when necessary. For example, I want a man to run for president who will veto every bill that he receives until Congress sends him the Sanctity of Life bill, or one with comparable language. I want someone who isn’t afraid to play hardball in defense of what is right.

    DISCLAIMER: I’m Canadian. This sort of thing literally cannot happen in our system of government. Also, My views on abortion are rather wishy-washy.

    Regardless of the issue, I would immediately dismiss any politician of any political stripe that promised to use this specific tactic. A proper leader would not need to resort to such childish displays of pique. He should have the wisdom and ability to accomplish what needs to be done in the face of opposition through leadership, the bully-pulpit and old fashioned politicking.

    The problem is not a lack of conviction on this issue, it is a lack of political skill.

    Also, without the Supreme Court on your side, this sort of grandstanding is both counterproductive and meaningless.

    And against that, you have to balance the probability that you will end up with a Supreme Court that favours security over basic human rights. I’m not sure why these two things almost always come in a package, but they do.

  • Gerald Cameron

    Oh, and I forgot to mention: aside from that one point, I agree with everything else you said.

  • James

    Good post, Seth. And I don’t find the tactic to be at all childish. Grinding the system to a halt is part of what is built into the system to protect against tyranny. And to draw that kind of a line in the face of the murder of the unborn would be an act of bold character.

    In our system there is still a way for Congress to “do stuff” but it would require 2/3 majority on everything to do it. But it would make the point that there is one single priority for the President and that it must come first.

  • Seth Ben-Ezra

    Gerald,

    Obviously I agree with James that I don’t see that particular tactic as being childish. It’s actually one of the methods built into our system of government to bring the system to a halt. I’m of the opinion that these brakes were intentionally placed into our government by the designers to allow the various parts of government to stop each other. Even in government, System Matters. 😀

    Would this fix the problem? No, probably not. However, it would force a crisis of government that would blow the lid off a lot of rhetoric. It would require that people take sides in the conflict, especially in Congress. Talk is easy; action is hard. That’s what I’d like to see.

  • Floyd

    For example, I want a man to run for president who will veto every bill that he receives until Congress sends him the Sanctity of Life bill, or one with comparable language. I want someone who isn’t afraid to play hardball in defense of what is right.

    Amen to that. And not just our president, but all the congressmen and lesser magistrates as well.

    Of course, why would our elected officials play hardball if we as voters won’t?

    If we aren’t willing to withold our votes from those that won’t, for example, support the Sanctity of Life Act, we can’t very well expect them to. Politicians don’t generally put their political viability into jeopardy. So we have to be willing to do it for them.

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